• Reshaping baby’s future

    Megan Kane being held by her mother

    Craniosynostosis is a birth defect in which one or more of the seven fibrous joints in a baby’s skull—called sutures—is prematurely closed. This limits the space needed for brain and skull growth and often leads to craniofacial malformations

  • Parent Blog: Rebecca Johnson

    Lexy Johnson, photo

    "She didn't know her name, she gave her birthdate scrambled, and she couldn't do simple things like pulling or pushing. After the CT results came back, we were told that Lexy had a tumor on the right side of her brain, and a build-up of fluid and pressure that required immediate attention. Lexy was then airlifted to UI Stead Family Children's Hospital." —Rebecca Johnson

  • Parent Blog: Jolene Paulson

    Blaine Araujo, portrait

    Blaine fell when he was 2 years old and needed neck surgery, and Arnold Menezes, MD, discovered he had a cervical stenosis–the protective area around the spine had degenerated and become narrow.

  • Lucy Roth

    Lucy Roth, portrait

    Lucy was a healthy baby and toddler, but she began having vision problems at 2 years old. Pediatric ophthalmologists at University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital ordered an MRI that revealed a massive brain tumor. During the subsequent 12-hour surgery, pediatric neurosurgeons were able to remove a large amount of the tumor. Lucy, however, was not out of the woods.

  • Parent Blog: Dan and Manda Shine

    Gemma Shine, photo

    "We met with a pediatric neurosurgeon who confirmed a diagnosis of metopic craniosynostosis with trigonocephaly – the front suture of her skull had fused prematurely in utero and would need to be separated and reconstructed surgically." – Dan and Manda

  • Parent Blog: Nicole Schneeberger

    Nicole Schneeberger's son, photo

    "I really would like to thank the pre-op and post-op staff from the operating room and on the 9th floor who cared for my son during such a scary time. They were truly amazing and I can’t thank them enough for being top-notch." -Schneeberger Scheeberger

  • Ean Gorsh

    Ean Gorsh, portrait

    In February 2014, Ean fell asleep and began vomiting. Unresponsive and not breathing, his parents called 911, and Ean was rushed to the emergency room by ambulance. After testing, pediatric neurologists at University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital determined he was having seizures caused by epilepsy.

  • Parent Blog: Ashley Kayser

    Parker Calkins, photo

    When Parker was 3 days old, a pediatric neurosurgeon confirmed my son’s diagnosis of congenital hydrocephalus. At 4 months old, he underwent surgery to place a VP shunt within his brain.

  • Parent Blog: Teri Gorsh

    Ean Gorsch photo

    "In February of 2014, our son, Ean, had starting mysteriously waking up with vomit in his bed. It wasn't until he fell asleep watching TV one evening that we discovered what was really going on." -Teri Gorsh

  • Leah McClain

    Leah McClain

    Leah was 7 years old and living with her family in Knoxville, Iowa, when she had her first life-threatening seizure. Her parents took her to a local emergency room, and she was flown by helicopter to a Des Moines hospital. Two months later, she had a similar seizure and was again taken to Des Moines. By summer of that year, she was experiencing headaches and intestinal issues.

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