• Knox Tysdahl

    Tysdahl family photo

    “People put clichés on teaching hospitals, they say they’re impersonal, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. This place is incredibly special to us. These people are family.”

  • Parent Blog: Rachel Lentz

    Eva Lentz photo

    "It is so encouraging to know that they all love Eva and are working together toward the goal of transplant and a healthy, best quality of life post-transplant." - Rachel Lentz

  • Comprehensive and convenient

    For patients and families, Quad Cities location means specialty care close to home

  • Pediatric vision team saves Jack’s sight from congenital cataracts, glaucoma

    Nathan and Jack Marks

    Pediatric vision team saves baby's sight from congenital cataracts, glaucoma.

  • Parent Blog: Hilary and Brannon Spengler

    Jordy Spengler photo

    "We know we are very fortunate and are thankful for the care he received. Everyone that cared for our son played such a crucial part in his survival and experience." — Hilary and Brannon Spengler

  • UI researcher talks of personal experience with sickle cell disease

    Amirah Butali

    Dr. Butali shares the story of his daughter, Amirah, and her struggles with sickle cell disease before getting a life-changing bone marrow transplant from her 5-year-old brother in 2016.

  • Jaelyn Butikofer

    Jaelyn Butikofer

    Jaelyn first came to University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital in December 2010, when she was 10 months old. She wasn’t gaining weight, and her local doctor referred her to UI Stead Family Children’s Hospital for “failure to thrive.” She weighed just 10 pounds.

  • Hunter Fasse

    Hunter Fasse

    During his mother’s 20-week ultrasound at her local doctor’s office, Hunter’s parents learned he would be born with a cleft lip and palate. They were referred to University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital for further testing, and the cleft lip and palate were confirmed.

  • Cooper Foster

    Cooper Foster

    Cooper was very sick as a baby. At 1 month old, he was hospitalized for repeated vomiting, issues with weight gain, and difficulty with normal bowel movements. Over the course of 10 days at a Cedar Rapids hospital, his condition turned dangerously worse.

  • Flynn Lanferman

    Flynn Lanferman

    A persistent fever, mysterious bruising, and a stubborn nosebleed gave 3-year-old Flynn’s local pediatrician cause for concern. When results from blood tests came back, he had an ambulance waiting to transfer Flynn and his mom to University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital. Once Flynn’s father arrived, they were told Flynn had leukemia.

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